NHTSA finds speeding is partially an attitude problem

In today's hectic world, many people are increasingly becoming pressed for time in meeting their work or personal responsibilities. As a result, many attempt to regain some time by speeding while in transit between obligations. Unfortunately, like other forms of dangerous driving, speeding can significantly increase the risk of car accidents.

This truth was recently demonstrated right here in Minnesota when a car that was traveling more than 100 miles-per-hour on Interstate 694 collided with a semitrailer truck. According to witnesses, the driver of the car did not attempt to stop. However, officials say that a car traveling at that speed would not have much time to react, so it may have been impossible for the driver of the car to avoid the collision. As a result of this tragic highway accident, both of the car's occupants lost their lives.

Despite similar tragic consequences that are repeated virtually every day, most drivers admit to speeding from time-to-time. To add insult to injury, most drivers have a rather lax attitude about speeding, according to a recent survey from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

About the survey

The NHTSA has long suspected that driver attitudes regarding speeding are partially to blame for the prevalence of speeding. As a result, the agency decided to conduct a survey to learn more about what drivers thought about speeding in order to improve its driver education programs.

Drivers from every state participated in the survey. When the results of the survey were compiled, the NHTSA found that many Americans have conflicting beliefs about speeding. According to the results, 80 percent of respondents said that driving within the speed limit allowed them to better avoid car accidents and other hazards encountered on the road.

Despite the majority's belief that speeding made them safer drivers, over a quarter of the respondents said that they regularly sped, mainly because they did not realize how fast they were going or enjoyed speeding. Shockingly, a further 16 percent of drivers said that they believed that their speed had no effect on their ability to drive safely. The survey also found that the respondents' answers often fell along gender and age lines. In general, males were more likely than females to admit to speeding. In addition, speeding was the most prevalent among teen drivers, which incidentally, was the group most likely to die in a car accident.

Speak to an attorney

The NHTSA estimates that speeding comprises about one-third (about 10,000) of all traffic fatalities nationwide each year. Unfortunately, the trend is no different in Minnesota, as illegal or unsafe speeds are the primary cause of single vehicle crashes, according to state statistics.

Despite being unsafe and against the law, there will likely always be drivers that choose to exceed a safe speed. Since the law requires all drivers to operate their vehicle in a reasonably safe manner, speeding drivers can face a civil lawsuit for negligence if they injure someone else. If you have been injured because of a driver's negligence, an experienced personal injury attorney can assist you in recovering compensation for the expenses resulting from the accident.